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Walk This Way by pergamjee Walk This Way by pergamjee
Mo. Seven weeks old. Female ♀

Yes, she is tail-less. As mentioned to :iconwinterous: ...

"... There must be a mutant gene in our local street cat population ... it is not common to find a full-length straight tail. Our cats are rescued or adopted, and amongst the more than 80 cats that have come into our home over the past decades, only a half dozen or so had full-length tails ... "



I have been asked if she's a Manx. It may interest you that the tailless cat is not just a natural mutation that occurred on the Isle of Man in the late 18th century (the origin of the Manx), but also appeared in several places in the world since earlier times, such as Japan and Southeast Asia.

When Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, the English colonial administrator, was in the Malayan Archipalego (1811-1823), he noted and wrote about the abundance of tailless/shorttailed cats in the region. He was a historian, with a keen interest in zoology, and also the founder of the London Zoological Society and the London Zoo.

In 1868, Darwin wrote in The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication that "Throughout an immense area, namely the Malayan archipelago, Siam, Pegu, and Burmah, all the cats have truncated tails about half the proper length, often with a sort of knot at the end."

In ancient Japanese folklore, tales of tailless cats are common.

It is interesting (to me!) that many of the places where these mutation occur naturally are islands ... it appears that the geographical limitations contributed to the proliferation of a mutated gene.
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:iconjonnyschweer:
JonnySchweer Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2015
*humming* .... she got the moves like Jagger ....
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:iconanimalluvr6:
animalluvr6 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Student Artist
I love the fact she has not tail! I used to have tailless cats and I find them to be awesome! I'm not sure why it was one of our cats had a litter with half tailless kittens and the other 2 had tails when she bred with a tailed cat. I dont believe she was a manx cat she seemed like she was mixed. She's adorable and I love how they prance that little butt around! :iconomgcatplz: :giggle:
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013
Many of our local street cats have no tails or very short/deformed ones .... must be some gene mutation ... like the way the manx started, on the British Isle of Man. In fact, a long straight tail is not as common! We have had many tail-less/short-tailed cats.

haha ... it is strange that you said "prance that little butt around" ... it is so similar to what a friend described as "strut their stuff"! :D:D:D

Hey, you want to see another of our tail-less kitty? ^^ ... [link]
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:iconanimalluvr6:
animalluvr6 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013  Student Artist
That must be awesome! Awww talk about a cutie! Hhaaa yes they are so silly! :D :giggle:
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:iconakitoharu:
Akitoharu Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
Oh this one looks SO much like my cat, Saya :D I just have it right beside me and the back of the head.. it's like they're twins!
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
Ahhh yes, Saya the snowcat! Saya the snowman-maker! Saya who likes to have snow rubbed into her fur! I remember her ... yup, same color and markings ...
but :iconnocatplz: Saya is much bigger and has a long tail! :D:D:D

Hey, did this winter have plenty of snow for Saya to play in? ^^
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
No tail :(
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
Yes, not even a short stump. There must be a mutant gene in our local street cat population ... it is not common to find a full-length straight tail. Our cats are rescued or adopted, and amongst the more than 80 cats that have come into our home over the past decades, only a half dozen or so had full-length tails ... and these were mainly those that had some pedigree blood in them ... part Persian for some, part Siamese for some. But I don't see it as something to be sad about ... I find them all cute, whether no tail, or short stumps of a few inches, or three-quarter-length, straight or with kinks ... I don't apply human standards of beauty for felines ...
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
It's not about appearance, they're still adorable, but tails serve a function and it sucks that they've lost that function.
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:iconfoxywitch1111:
Foxywitch1111 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
i think it's the same with a blind person born that way, they learn how to function with out it and still do ordinary things. ^^
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Well if someone was specifically breeding humans to be blind, would you be ok with that?
Because that's what I object to, breeding things like pug dogs who have life threatening medical issues for their whole life, just because they were bred to have stubby noses.
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:iconfoxywitch1111:
Foxywitch1111 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
is it deadly for them? plus humans do have mutations that everybody thinks it's normal.
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
It can be fatal, because the messed up structure of their nose is prone to infection and other complications; pugs need more medical care than other dogs because of their selectively bred facial structure.

And mutations aren't what this is about, it's about people taking creatures with traits they like, and breeding them together to compound the effect; this is called selective breeding, and it's done with every domestic animal.
The problem arises when the traits that are getting bred have detrimental effects to the animal's well-being.

You can kinda compare the pug situation to someone specifically breeding humans who have a genetic predisposition to a particular kind of cancer, regardless of what 'benefit' it produces, the negative effects are unethical.
Pug breeding should rightfully be banned, they are a human creation that causes unnecessary suffering for the dogs.
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
Sure ... I think it is believed that the tail does something for their balance? But from my decades of observation of these tail-less and shorter-tail cats, they don't seem to be that much affected in their daily lives ... they still hunt and kill birds, gekkoes, newts, rats, insects, etc. (and bring these prizes back for their humans! horrors!) Another thing often said about cat's tail is that it helps in expressing their emotional state ... I have even read someone's opinion that a tail-less cat is like a mute person. I'm not certain how accurate that is ... haha, our cats seem able to summon us and train us to service them! :D:D

Don't get me wrong ... I am not making light of your concern. If this were a feature/mutation that humans have deliberately bred-in, like they have done for many many of the feline features we see in pedigrees today, then yes, I would agree that it sucks. But this appears to be some kind of natural selection of a mutated gene, for whatever reason. I don't know the science behind this, but isn't that what evolution is about?
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
Well in an urban environment the effects of natural selection are changed drastically, for a start the population isn't what it would be in the wild, so breeding might be more opportune than selective.
I'd guess that the tail loss wasn't so much due to mutation as it was from breeding with cats that were bred to have no tail, but it could be either.

Also I think the tail is a significant part of cat communication, but obviously not essential as cats without tails would figure out ways to communicate without it; it's also used for balance purposes, so these cats might not be so easily able to walk along fences and such.

I know that the tail isn't actually of great use for their in-air orientation correction, they use their legs and spine to modify their centre of rotation in order to do that.
[link]
Good video
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
Hey, it may interest you that the tailless cat is not just a natural mutation that occurred on the Isle of Man in the late 18th century, but also appeared in several places in the world since earlier times, such as Japan and Southeast Asia.

When Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, the English colonial administrator, was in the Malayan Archipalego (1811-1823), he noted the abundance of tailless/shorttailed cats in the region. He was a historian, with a keen interest in zoology, and also the founder of the London Zoological Society and the London Zoo.

In 1868, Darwin wrote in The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication that "Throughout an immense area, namely the Malayan archipelago, Siam, Pegu, and Burmah, all the cats have truncated tails about half the proper length, often with a sort of knot at the end."

In ancient Japanese folklore, tales of tailless cats are common.

It is interesting (to me!) that many of the places where these mutation occur naturally are islands ... it appears that the geographical limitations contributed to the proliferation of a mutated gene.
Reply
:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
Yeah limited landmass increases the instance of inbreeding a lot, meaning mutated genes eventually spread to the entire population.
Take the Tasmanian Devils for example, they're all so genetically similar that there is a contagious cancer problem amongst their population, and it's because their host landmass is so small.
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
And therein lies the principle of Darwin's natural selection I guess ... that the genetically inferior will thus become extinct ...
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:iconpergamjee:
pergamjee Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
Thanks for the link ... adds to list of things to watch ...
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:iconwinterous:
Winterous Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
^^
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